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Quality support for the decisions students make

Where Do We Go From Here?
A Parent's Guide to Helping with University Selection

 

By Michael R. Peirce, Ed.D.

Article Information

This paper was the result of Dr. Peirce's work when he was awarded the Shell Canada Merit Fellowship in Career Education. It was intended as a guide to help parents support their children during the demanding post-secondary decision making process. This article served as the foundation for Dr. Peirce's book "It's Your Choice" and was presented to the Shell Canada Fellowship in Career education in 1983.

Note: Due to the age of this article many of the web links are no longer valid. For current web links <click here>

 

This material was last updated in February, 1999 and may be reproduced for publication with the written permission of the Director on the understanding that acknowledgement will be given to the author and the Shell Canada Merit Fellowship in Career Education Programme.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
How can parents help?
What are the alternatives?
Relevant questions about Canadian post-secondary choices.
American post-secondary institutions.
Application procedures and schedules.
Residence
University entrance requirements.
Where can information be found?
Canadian University Liaison Addresses
Addresses for more information about

INTRODUCTION

A student's decision about educational opportunities following secondary school can be one of the most difficult and traumatic experiences of an educational career. A student, whose personal goals are often unclear and who may lack experience and self confidence, is faced with high peer and parental expectations as well as with a society in which careers are changing at an incredible rate. Even so, we as parents, teachers, and counsellors must never forget that it is the student who must live with the decision concerning the educational future.

Parents can play an important role in helping to make the decision making process an easier burden to carry. Certain characteristics are crucial to the viability of this parental role. Communication between parents and students must be open, honest, relaxed and very importantly, realistic. Encouragement helps to motivate the process and aid in a decision with which it is easier to live. Finally, parents must know the facts about alternatives available to the student.

This guide is not a formula to success. Its intent is to provide some of the basic information which can help parents locate facts about alternatives open to their children upon completion of secondary school.

HOW CAN PARENTS HELP ??

Parents are constantly making important decisions concerning all aspects of life for themselves and their family. It becomes an almost automatic process through experience. Many students lack this experience and need guidance through this decision-making process which we so often take for granted. Caution should be taken not to use inexperience as an excuse to make the decision for the student. Happiness with a decision is less likely if a student is not directly involved with the process. Although parents must avoid making the post-secondary decision for their children, a supportive role is very important. The following suggestions may help set up this role.

ENCOURAGE AN EARLY START!! Too often, a student has not investigated the educational options available after secondary school until the final year. By this time, it is virtually impossible to ensure that a person has the proper pre-requisites and qualifications necessary for the chosen programme. Any good decision involves adequate research of the options. Parents are in an ideal position to encourage research and to discuss future educational goals as early as the first year in high school.

KNOW THE FACTS!! Students tend to avoid much research concerning the educational alternatives for which they are planning. Both students and parents must have up-to-date facts about the options being considered. Constructive discussion is impossible without these.

BE SUPPORTIVE!! During the decision-making process, students appreciate encouragement and support. With support, the student tends to be more open to discussion and suggestion about the available alternatives. Open discussion is a necessity when trying to understand the goals and expectations of a student.

ENCOURAGE REALISM!! Even if one has considered all the factors, it is of little use if these have not been evaluated realistically. One of the most frustrating and disappointing experiences for a student is to find, upon completion of high school, that the programme being sought is too competitive or is not as challenging as was expected. Parents are often in the best position to gauge how realistic their children's goals are. If doubts exist, seek the assistance of teachers and advisors. Students are made aware of the appropriate cut-off averages for admission to programmes.

DISCOURAGE LIMITING OPTIONS!! Often one hears of a student's career aspirations lying in a very specific occupational field. During our economic ups and downs, it becomes impossible to predict the availability of openings in specific careers following post-secondary graduation. Parents can encourage students to prepare for a broader spectrum of career opportunities by discouraging early specialization in secondary educational programmes. A well rounded academic background is, in most instances, far easier to market in terms of accessibility to higher education.

SUPPORT A VISIT TO A CAMPUS!! Each year students head off to university never having seen the institution before. The best way to evaluate the atmosphere of a particular school is to visit. University liaison offices will often set up campus visits including a chance to see a classroom lecture. All students should visit the campuses of the universities they are considering. After all, would you buy a car you have read about but never driven?

CONSULT THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS!! Usually a student can talk to former students, parents and alumni of a desired institution to get a more personal feel of what the university is like. Do not be afraid to ask about dislikes as well as likes. These questions often better prepare a student for the orientation to school life.

WHAT ARE THE ALTERNATIVES ??

Following secondary school, there are a variety of educational alternatives available to students. The range from career oriented programmes such as those offered through apprenticeship programmes or technical colleges to the more traditional academic settings such as universities. Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

A large variety of post-secondary programmes is offered at community colleges across the country. The diversity of these programmes is extensive. Programmes vary in length from one to three years. Entrance requirements vary greatly depending on the provincial location of the province, but generally require one less year of secondary education than universities. Canadian Universities

Programmes at the university level tend to fall into one of two categories. The majority of faculties offer academic type course purely for the intellectual development of the individual. There are also a number of professional type faculties such as engineering, medicine, dentistry, law, nursing, and architecture which offer training in specific vocational fields. Entrance requirements to university vary drastically from province to province as well as from programme to programme. If a university is being considered, it is absolutely necessary that up-to-date entrance requirements be ascertained. There tends to be little flexibility in the professional faculties if pre-requisites such as Mathematics and Science are not met. American Universities

While offering the same kind of educational choices as the Canadian universities, the U.S. schools tend to have more dramatic departmental strengths and weaknesses. Many of the top American colleges offer liberal arts curricula in order to provide a broad undergraduate programme. The characteristics of many small competitive colleges make them very attractive alternatives. Cost is a significant factor to be considered in American universities.

RELEVANT QUESTIONS ABOUT
CANADIAN POST-SECONDARY CHOICES

Following the selection of a programme at the post-secondary level, the student must then choose the appropriate institution. In Canada, the educational system has a consistently high level of academic quality. For this reason, the choice of institution need not focus solely on which institution, but rather which institution is best suited for a particular student. If one knows which schools offer the desired programme, the selection process should analyze the options by considering the types of factors illustrated by the following questions.

Where is the institution located?? The setting of an institution often dictates much about the atmosphere and activities available to the student body. For example, a college in a small town has a very different atmosphere from that of a cosmopolitan campus. Easy access may also be a necessity for some students but not for others.

How many students are enroled at the institution?? Size has a significant affect on the atmosphere and the number of courses or activities offered by institution. It is also useful to find the enrolment statistics for the programme of interest. Class size is of considerable importance to many students.

What is the cost of the programme?? Financial aspects sometimes limit options. In investigating cost, find information about the availability of financial aid. Often university scholarship money goes unused owing to a lack of qualified applicants. In terms of provincial loans and bursaries, some restrictions are placed on certain institutions such as out-of-province schools. Find out how these may affect your specific case. Do not forget to include the everyday expenses such as books, and travel. These days, both can add significant sums to the total cost of university.

What facilities are available to the students?? Residence capacity and acceptance policies can effect the availability of housing. These factors can be a problem for students attending school away from home. The importance of the availability of recreation facilities varies from student to student.

What services are available to the student population?? Counselling and health services of varying degrees are available at most post-secondary institutions. Many campuses have career placement centres to help students find possible post-graduation employment. Others have excellent programmes helping students deal with the transition to university, study skills, personal issues and learning disabilities. Students should be aware of what is available to them.

What are the entrance requirements for the programme?? The same programme at two institutions do not necessarily have the same entrance requirements. Careful choice within the high school curriculum may increase the likelihood of gaining admission to limited enrolment programmes. Students should also be aware of the programme cut-off averages for each university to ensure realistic application choices.

What percentage of students complete the programme?? The answer to this question can give a good indication of the level of difficulty. Some programmes have very specific requirements about university performance in specific prerequisite undergraduate programmes.

What percentage of graduates find work related to the area of study completed?? Certainly, in professional programmes, the answer to this question and serve as a good indicator of the potential market for related careers. It can also point out how well a particular programme is recognised in the preparation of its graduates.

What are the regulations regarding academic performance in the particular programme?? Often students are expected to achieve a certain level in order to continue in a specific programme. Certain Honours programmes require minimum grade averages in order to gain entrance to the final year. A number of professional programmes may require one or two years of undergraduate study before a student can apply. Caution should be taken in choosing high school courses which will prepare the student for the pre-requisite programme.

AMERICAN POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS

Unlike Canadian institutions, the quality of U.S. universities varies substantially from school to school. Although this fact does not make any of the aforementioned questions any less relevant, it does add another dimension to the quest for higher education.

One can get an indication of a school's quality by finding the entrance requirements, including standardized examinations such as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and Achievement examinations. Also, the school's ratio of applications/acceptance/enrolment can offer insight into a universities quality and popularity. Finally, a number of publications offer ranking of American universities by the fields of study.

Competitive colleges have extremely high admissions criteria. The majority of accepted students are in the top 10% to 15% of their classes, and have scored well on the SAT and Achievement examinations. Although academic performance throughout high school is the primary criterion for admission, personal achievement outside the classroom is an important factor. The better U.S. universities look for personal excellence in fields like creative and performing arts, athletics, community service, leadership roles, unique experience and other extracurricular areas. Outstanding achievement in some extracurricular endeavour is almost essential.

Finally, cost is a much more significant concern in the United States. The price of a single year of education can be as high as $30,000 in Canadian funds. Government financial aid does not tend to be available to the Canadian student. Some privately funded universities do offer substantial scholarships or financial aid to outstanding Canadian scholars. Often this aid is tied to perceived financial need and can come in the form of a package including loan, student job and grant.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Once all the research and decision-making on the part of the student are done, the application must be completed. An application is often the sole personal work which a student submits to a university. Any written work of a student should be checked for grammar, spelling and punctuation. Neatness is an absolute necessity. A student should apply to schools which are believed to fulfil the desired academic and social expectations. It is often a good idea to choose a range of schools from one with difficult entrance standards to one which will most likely accept the student. Realism is a necessity during this process.

Ontario Universities

A student applies to Ontario universities an/or programmes on a common application form provided through the Ontario University Applications Centre (OUAC) which is located in Guelph. The form is distributed through the secondary schools guidance offices in early October and is completed by the student and submitted by the school. Changes to the initial choices may be made by the student at any time, but after mid-February it becomes more difficult to find programmes which are not filled. Academic records are sent by the school in early February. The Senior Year marks are based on a cumulative result of the first term results and Christmas exams. Early decisions are made on the basis of these marks and are offered following the receipt of those marks.. These offers are conditional on successful completion of the year by the student. Universities may not ask for an acceptance to an offer of admission before June 1st. Final grades are submitted by the school upon completion of the school year. Significant decreases in averages could result in an acceptance being withdrawn. Deferred decisions may be delayed as late as August. Limited enrollment programmes tend to be filled by this time.

Other Canadian Universities

All other Canadian universities have separate application forms which are filled out by the student. It is the student's responsibility to notify the Guidance Office of applications so that transcripts may be sent. There is no maximum number of applications which can be sent but a student needs to be realistic. Application deadlines for these applications range from February 1st to late May depending on the university.

American Universities

Applications to American universities have much earlier deadlines than those to Canadian schools, usually in December or early January. Application forms and information requested tend to be much more extensive and detailed than their Canadian counterparts. Items like teacher references, counsellor comments, personal interviews, and essays written by the student all may be required. These demands necessitate a much earlier start and more organized approach to the application process for an American university.

Individuals applying to American universities should have all the relevant information and have requested application forms by September in order to be properly prepared for the process. Students will have to obtain their own applications as they are typically not available in the Guidance Resource Area. The counsellor and teachers writing references on behalf of the student will need to be approached by late October if reference material is to be completed properly. Students should start conceptualizing their essays during the summer before the application will be submitted so that proof-reading and corrections can be done early in the school year, ensuring the best quality of work possible. An on-campus interview is preferable to an alumni interview, but not all schools offer them. A campus visit is essential to get a feel of the university.

As SAT results tend to be an important factor in the student's application file, preparation is essential. There is a variety of preparation packages and courses available which have been shown to improve students' results. Being familiar with the style of testing can be a real asset to the examinee. A student also needs to be aware of any Achievement examinations which may be required by the institution being considered. Good scores in these examinations tend to make entrance to U.S. colleges more likely.

A student with a strong academic record through secondary school can apply for early decision or early action. Applications must be completed and sent with all supporting documentation by early November. The university's response is sent in mid December. A student may only apply to one university in this manner. An early decision acceptance is binding. In other words, if one is accepted, no other applications to U.S. schools may be submitted. Early action is typically non-binding. Although the applicant pool for this type of application is smaller, the competition is vigorous. A student should check with the guidance counsellor before making an early decision or action application for an opinion about the strength of the application.

RESIDENCE

Residence can set the tone of a university's social life. Many styles of residence are found on Canadian campuses. Some residences are single sex, others are coeducational by floor, and others are coeducational by room. Some residences are designated as quiet residences or may be associated with a particular language. The choice can be overwhelming but it is important to realize that the style of residence will have a significant effect on the lifestyle of the student.

For a student attending university away from home, it is often considered beneficial to live in residence for the first year to help with acclimatization to the university lifestyle and to create an academic network of friends which often lasts through the university career. Preferential treatment may be given to applicants with higher marks in the allocation of residence places. A student should be aware of this fact when applying to an institution. Application to residence may be separate from the application to university and may be made before acceptance to the university is granted. Students must be aware of the procedure for application to residence by carefully reading the literature which is received from the institution. Entrance to a residence may end up being the deciding factor about attending a university. If one is not careful, the summer months may be spent looking for appropriate accommodation.

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

 The following table provides a summary for the typical requirements to undergraduate programmes in Canadian Universities. As this is a summary, it is essential to check the requirements for each university programme in the publications produced by the universities.

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMMES

OAC

Courses

Arts

Social Science

Business

Engineer

Science

Math

Architect

Comp. Science

English

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Finite Math

R

X/R

O

   

R

   

Calculus

 

X/R

O

X

X

X

X

O

Alg. & Geom.

 

X/R

O

X

O

X

X

O

Chemistry

     

X

O

   

O

Physics

     

X

O

 

X

O

Biology

       

O

     

2nd Language

R

             

Social Science

R

   

R

       

X - OAC Prerequisite
R - Recommended in some cases
O - A combination of marked courses

Graduate Fields: A number of fields, such as Law, Dentistry and Medicine are considered Graduate programmes which can be entered upon completion of a Bachelor's degree or following a number of years of undergraduate education. Students interested in these types of programmes should take an appropriate undergraduate programme and should be prepared for intense competition.

Law: Usually entered following an undergraduate programme. Strong verbal and reading skills are required. LSAT examination also expected.

Medicine: Usually entered following an undergraduate Science programme although this may not always be the case. MCAT examinations are expected.

Education: While the majority of student in an education programme have completed an undergraduate degree, concurrent programmes are offered at a number of universities where the education courses are combined with the undergraduate programme of the student. These programmes typically take five years to complete.

WHERE CAN INFORMATION BE FOUND??

Finding information concerning post-secondary institutions can be a long and tedious task. Fortunately, there are a number of publications which summarize the programmes offered and the pre-requisites needed by the various institutions. Addresses for the publications described can be found at the conclusion of this booklet. These publications and others are located in your school's guidance resource centre.

Canadian Universities and Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

The majority of booklets produced about Canadian institutions summarizes both the university and technical college programmes available.

The Guidance Centre at the University of Toronto publishes a series called "Spectrum" which is produced annually. Each of the four booklets deals with the programmes offered by post-secondary institutions in the various regions of Canada. There are booklets for the Atlantic provinces, Quebec, Ontario and Western Canada. They provide information about programmes offered along with the specific pre-requisites for each university offering the programme within that region.

Educational Guidance Services publishes "For Grads Only". This university admissions guide provides information cut-off averages, pre-requisite courses, residence procedures and addresses for programmes throughout Canada. Each student in the graduating class will have a copy of this publication.

A publication called "INFO" is produced semi-annually as a reference guide for guidance counsellors. The Fall issue summarizes the admission requirements, cut-off averages and new developments in the university scene. Each student in the graduating class receives a copy of "INFO" The Spring issue deals with residence applications, special needs students as well as with scholarship information. Access to the spring publication is only available through the guidance office.

Each university and college publishes its own information package and calendar, but unless one is looking at specific details about a specific institution, it is advisable to get an overall picture before focusing on the more detailed and specific information.

Some useful Canadian University Web sites

http://www.uwaterloo.ca/canu/index.html
This index of Canadian University home pages also provides links to the MacLean's Magazine rankings, information for international students, university homepages, and listings of university programs.

http://www.ouac.on.ca
The Ontario Universities Applications Centre (OUAC) is the central clearinghouse of application to universities located in Ontario. All undergraduate applications as well as applications to medical schools and law faculties are administered though this organization. The site provides details about many application procedures as well as links to university home pages.

http://www.schoolnet.ca/adm/guidance/index.html
Schoolnet is a web site designed for high school students making educational and career decisions. It provides numerous links to a variety of relevant topics.

http://homer.aucc.ca/
The web site of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) provides an index, links, map locations and descriptions to Canadian institutions as well as information about the Canadian post-secondary education system.

http://www.ouac.on.ca/osca/
The homepage of the Ontario School Counsellors Association (OSCA) provides numerous links to information regarding education and careers in Canada.

http://www.canadianembassy.org/studyincanada/index.html
This site at the Canadian Embassy in Washington D.C. provides information to international students who wish to study in Canada including some details and regulations about obtaining student visas and work permits.

Last updated: April 20, 1998
Michael Peirce, Ed.D,
Peirce Educational Consulting
mpeirce@PeirceEducational.com

WHERE CAN INFORMATION BE FOUND??
American Universities

A large number of summaries are available for details on American programmes and institutions. A few of the better publications are described below.

"Peterson's Guide to Four Year Colleges and Universities" lists institutions alphabetically and has a series of indices to aid a student narrowing choices based on factors such as major, entrance difficulty, size, location, etc. A paragraph is written about each university, summarizing relevant statistics about these details.

"The College Handbook" is published by College Board Publications each year and provides basic information regarding admissions requirements, size, location and campus setting, majors and expenses.

"The Fiske Guide to the Colleges" is an annual comprehensive collection of descriptions of the competitive colleges in the U.S. It rates items such as the academic programme, quality of life, and cost. Each school is also described in terms of its strengths and weaknesses.

"The Insider's Guide to the Colleges" is an annual production focusing mainly on U.S. schools. Actual students give a summary of each school's strengths and weaknesses. There are several other sections of interest including a glossary of terms, explanations of statistics, and a section listing universities which have special characteristics.

Some Useful U.S. Guidance Web Sites

Exploring College Options

http://www.collegeboard.org *College Board’s Homepage-Contains college search engine, testing information, & financial aid calculator,
http://www.collegeview.com *College View On-line college search, electronic applications, financial aid information. and more
http://www.angelfire.com/nj/hsstudentresourcepgs/index.html *Lin Avellino’s page from Bound Brook HS in NJ with links to college and financial searches plus many more interesting sites
http://www.yahoo.com/Education/ *Hundred of Web sites related to college selection process
http://www.heic.org/guide/cic/cicapply.htm *Higher Ed. Info Center--easy to use site with many links
http://www.petersons.com *Peterson’s --has good college search engine & their college information database
http://www.review.com/college/choose *Princeton Review site to help in choosing a college
http://usnews.com/usnews/edu/html *U.S. News college search page and college rankings
http://www.volvo.gslis.utexas.edu:80/-acadres/ *Academic Advising-contains diverse links to college admission, & academic advising
http://www.collegenet.com/cnmain.html *College Net-searchable databases of colleges, scholarship opportunities and academic resources
http://collegeedge.com *College, Career and Fin. Aid Search engines, and has on-line applications.
http://edworks.com/index.html *College Search
http://www.collegenet.com *Lists colleges by states and has simple college search
http://collegeplan.org *College Search
http://www.ecola.com/college *College Search by city and state
http://www.hillel.org *Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life
http://www.review.com/college/index.cfm *Info on getting into college, finding a school, and
access to colleges ranked by category
http://www.aamc.org/medicalschools.htm  *Information on colleges offering combined
bachelors/medical degree programs
http://www.collegexpress.com/ *College Express site offering college admission info
http://www.sourcepath.com/ *Evaluations of Admission and Fin. Aid resources
http://www.tpoint.net/-jewels/college.html *College Prep Page-information on career planning, college selection, alternatives to college, military, testing and admissions, fin. aid, & other resources
http://www.easi.ed.gov/index.html *U.S. Dept of Education site-EASI/Easy Access for
Students to find colleges and financial aid
http://www.nacac.com *National Association of College Admissions
Counseling Home Page +National College Fair info.
http://www.jayi.com/ACG *Fishnet-"one-stop college info on the Web"
http://www.niep.com *National Institute for Educational Planning site—college planning info, plus student & counselor tours
http://www.act.org *Comprehensive college info site maintained by ACT

On Line Applications

http://www.weapply.com *Info about their CD-ROM with applications for more than 500 colleges and universities
http://www.collegelink.com *College Link site with information about computerized applications
http://www.nassp.org/webs_frm.htm *Contains the Common Application
http://www.petersons.com *Contains Peterson’s Universal Application
http://www.heic.org *Comprehensive site maintained by the Higher Education Information Center with many useful links to colleges and on-line applications

Exploring Financial Aid

http://www.finaid.org *The most comprehensive Financial Aid on the Web with hundreds of useful links to all things financial
http://www.theoldschool.org/ Financial Aid Resource Center-Scholarship, Grants, Loans, maintained by Shawn Lindstrom and filled with good info
http://www..fastap.org *FASTaid huge useful database and good search engine
http://www.fastweb.com *Financial aid and scholarship information
http://www.yahoo.com/education/financial_aid/ *Yahoo site--many links to good sites & search engines
http://www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/express.html *Electronic FAFSA
http://www.collegeboard.com/finaid/fastud/html/proform *Electronic PROFILE form
http://www.cnet..com/home/ijblack/BlackExcel.shtml *Admission & Financial aid for black students
http://www.cs.cmu.edu *Financial Aid bibliography/scholarship link
http://www.nt.scbbs.com/finaid *Useful Links to Financial Aid information
http://www.student-loans.com/Repay.html *Estimates monthly payments, college loan programs
http://www.ed.gov/prog_info/SFA/StudentGuide/ *Overall source of Financial Aid information
http://www.collegesmart.com *Financial Aid calculator and information
http://www.educaid.com *Financial Aid info for students, parents & HS counselors

Exploring Scholarship Opportunities

http://scholarship-ar-us.org/free_database.htm *Free scholarship database
http://www.inc.pair.com/scholarshippage *Contains 121 searchable scholarships
http://www.800headstart.com *Free searchable scholarship database
http://www.collegenet.com/mach25/ *Free scholarship database sponsored by College Net
http://www.members.aol.com/ox13qr/webpages/eyfswm.html *Scholarships for Women and Minorities
http://web.fie.com/web/mol/ *Minority On-Line information services
http://www.uncf.org/programs/ *United Negro college fund
http://www.studentservices.com/fastweb *Private scholarship search
http://www.gocollege.com *Scholarship and college searches http://www.collegefundingco.com *College Funding company site
http://www.rams.com/srn/search.htm *College scholarships for undergraduate & graduate students
http://www.collegeexpress.com *Has private scholarship search on the site

Exploring Loan Opportunities
http://www.salliemae.com *Sallie Mae loan information
http://www.nelliemae.org *Nellie Mae loan information S
http://www.mefa.org *The Massachusetts Education Loan Authority site
http://www.teri.org *The Educational Resource Institute site
http://www.amsa.com *American Student Assistance site

Links to College Home Page Web Sites
http://www.mit.edu:8001/people/cdemello/univ.html *Comprehensive link to college home page web sites
http://www.yahoo.com/regional/countries/united_states/education/colleges_and_universities/public_by_state *Lists public colleges in the U.S. with web sites
http://www.yahoo.com/regional/countries/united_states/education/colleges_and_universities/private_by_state *Lists private colleges in the U.S. with web sites
http://www.yahoo.com/education/higher_education/colleges_and_universities

*Lists all colleges in the world that have a web site
http://www.clas.ufl.edu/CLAS/american-universities.html *Links to college home pages

Test Preparation
http://www.review.com *Princeton review site
http://www.kaplan.com *Kaplan site
http://www.testprep.com *SAT Prep
http://www.collegeboard.org *College Board site
http://www.gocollege.com *Free ACT and SAT test prep on the internet

Other Useful or Interesting Sites
http://www.putney.com/directory/college/college_couns.htm *Index of useful Web sites compiled by Joyce Vining Morgan at the Putney School, VT
http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/westspringfieldhs/career/college.htm  *West Springfield, VA HS site with many great links
http://www.tidus.com/PEHP2000/Planet_Earth/uni.html *Planet Earth home page with links to many useful sites
http://www.novakint.com/colleges *Directory of college e-mail addresses
http://www.niep.com *List of College tours
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/home.htm *US News College Fair including the best Colleges ranking
http://www3.zdnet.com/yil/content/college/intro.html *Lists America’s 100 Most Wired Colleges
http://beacon-www.asa.utk.edu/resources/papers.html#others *A link to the University of Tennessee-Knoxville that lists college newspapers on-line
http://www.petersons.com *Provides Vocational & Technical School information
http://www.nmt.edu/~larranag/hef.html *Hispanic Educational foundation site
http://www.ncaa.org *The NCAA site includes info. on eligibility requirements for Div. I and II colleges, recruiting policies, and Clearinghouse information
http://www.naia.org *National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics site
http://www.schev.edu/wuacadpg/acmsreb.html *SREB Academic Common Market site which lists in-state and out-of-state tuition for specific academic programs. This list of Web sites was compiled by Heather Black, ‘99 and Sam Smith,
Associate Dean of Enrollment, at Stonehill College Sept. 23, 1998.

UNIVERSITY LIAISON ADDRESSES

The following are addresses and telephone numbers for the liaison offices at a number of Canadian Universities which Appleby graduates have attended. Addresses to those institutions not mentioned can be found in the Guidance Office.

Director of Admissions, 
Acadia University
Wolfville, Nova Scotia 
B0P 1X0 
(902) 542-2201 Fax: (902) 542-2201     
e-mail: ask.acadia@acadiau.ca
web: http://www.acadiau.ca

Liaison Office, 
Bishop's University
Lennoxville, Quebec 
J1M 1Z7 
1-800-567-2792 Fax: 1-800-567-2792     
e-mail: liaison@ubishops.ca
web: http://www.ubishops.ca

School Liaison, 
Brock University
St. Catherines, Ontario 
L2S 3A1 
(905) 688-5550 Fax: (905) 688-5550     
e-mail: surgite@spartan.ac.brocku.ca
web: http://www.brocku.ca

Assistant Director of Admissions 
Carleton University
Ottawa, Ontario 
K1S 5B6 
1-800-276-7366 Fax: 1-800-276-7366     
e-mail: liaison@carleton.ca
web: http://www.carleton.ca

Liaison Office, 
Concordia University
7141 Sherbrooke Street West, 
Montreal, Quebec 
H4B 1R6 
(514) 848-4970 Fax: (514) 848-4970     
e-mail: admreg@topaz.concordia.ca  
web: http://www.concordia.ca

Director of Admissions, 
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia 
B3H 4H6 
(902) 494-2450 Fax: (902) 494-1630     
e-mail: admissions@dal.ca 
web: http://www.dal.ca

Liaison Officer, 
Huron College
London, Ontario 
N6G 1H3 
438-7224 
e-mail: kmazur@julian.uwo.ca 
web: http://www.uwo.ca/huron  

Liaison & Publications Officer, 
King's College
266 Epworth Avenue, 
London, Ontario 
N6A 2M3 
1-800-265-4406 Fax: 1-800-265-4406     
e-mail: kinmam@uwoadmin.uwo.ca 
web: http://www.uwo.ca./kings.kcweb

Assistant Registrar-Admissions, 
Lakehead University
Thunder Bay, Ontario 
P7B 5E1 
1-800-465-3959 Fax: 1-800-465-3959     
e-mail: liaison@lakeheadu.ca 
web: http://www.lakeheadu.ca

Liaison Office, 
Laurentian University
Sudbury, Ontario 
P3E 2C6 
(705) 675-4843 Fax: (705) 675-4843     
e-mail: admissions@nickel.laurentian.ca 
web: http://www.laurentian.ca

Information & Liaison Office, 
McGill University
805 Sherbrooke Street West, 
Montreal, Quebec 
H3A 2K6 
(514) 398-3910 Fax: (514) 398-3910     
e-mail: admissions@aro.lan.mcgil.ca
web: http://www.mcgill.ca

Liaison Officer, 
McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario 
L8S 4L8 
(905) 525-9140 Fax: (905) 525-9140     
e-mail: macadmit@mcmaster.ca 
web: http://www.mcmaster.ca

Director of Admissions, 
Mount Allison University
Sackville, New Brunswick 
E0A 3C0 
(506) 364-2270 Fax: (506) 364-2270     
e-mail: swallace@mta.ca 
web: http://www.mta.ca

Admissions/Liaison 
Nipissing University
Box 5002, 100 College Drive, 
North Bay, Ontario 
P1B 8L7 
(705) 474-3450 Fax:            (705) 474-3450     
e-mail: nipureg@adm.unipissing.ca 
web: http://www.unipisssing.ca

Secondary School Liaison, 
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario 
K7L 3N6 
(613) 545-2217 Fax: (613) 545-2217     
e-mail: liaison@post.queensu.ca 
web: http://www.queensu.ca/liaison/

Assistant Registrar, 
Royal Military College
Kingston, Ontario 
K7K 5L0 
(613) 541-6302 Fax:  (613) 541-6302     
web: http://www.rmc.ca

Admissions/Liaison, 
Ryerson Polytechnial University
Toronto, Ontario 
M5B 2K3 
(416) 979-5030 Fax: (416) 979-5030     
e-mail: inquire@acs.ryerson.ca 
web: http://www.ryerson.ca

Registrar, 
St. Francis Xavier University
Antigonish, Nova Scotia 
B2G 1C0 
(902) 867-2219 Fax: (902) 867-2219     
e-mail: admit@stfx.ca 
web: http://www.stfx.ca 

Director of Admissions, 
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, British Columbia 
V5A 1S6 
(604) 291-3224 Fax: (604) 291-3224     
e-mail: undergraduate-admissions@sfu.ca 
web: http://www.sfu.ca

Assistant Director/Schools Liaison, 
Trent University
P.O. Box 4800 
Peterborough, Ontario 
K9J 7B8 
(705) 748-1332 Fax: (705) 748-1332     
e-mail: liaison@trentu.ca 
web: http://www.trentu.ca

Admissions/Liaison, 
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta 
Y6G 2M7 
(403) 492-3113 Fax: (403) 492-3113     
e-mail: registrar@ualberta.ca 
web: http://www.registrat.ualberta.ca

Registrar, 
University of British Columbia
204-2075 Westbrook Mall, 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
V6T 1Z2 
(604) 228-3014 Fax: (604) 228-3014     
e-mail: registrar.admissions@ubc.ca 
web: http://www.admissions.ubc.ca

Office of Admissions, 
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive N.W., 
Calgary, Alberta 
T2N 1N4 
(403) 220-5110 Fax: (403) 220-5110     
web: http://www.ucalgary.ca

Associate Registrar - Liaison, 
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario 
N1G 2W1 
(519) 824-4120 Fax: (519) 824-4120     
e-mail: rdarling@registrar.uoguelph.ca 
web: http://www.uoguelph.ca

Admissions, 
University of King's College
Halifax, Nova Scotia 
B3H 2A1 
(902) 422-1271 Fax: (902) 422-1271     
e-mail: admissions@ukings.ns.ca 
web: http://www.ukings.ns.ca

Admissions, 
University of Manitoba
424 University Centre, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba 
R3B 2E9 
(204) 786-9740 Fax: (204) 786-9740     
e-mail: admissions@umanitoba.ca 
web: http://www.umanitoba.ca

Assistant Registrar, 
University of New Brunswick
Fredericton, New Brunswick 
E5B 5A3 
(506) 453-4864 Fax: (506) 453-4864     
web: http://www.unb.ca

Liaison Co-ordinator, 
University of Ottawa
Ottawa, Ontario 
K1N 6N5 
(613) 564-2262 Fax: (613) 564-2262     
e-mail: admisio@uottawa.ca 
web: http://www.uottawa.ca

Admissions Office 
University of Regina
Regina, Saskatchewan 
S4S 0A2 
(306) 585-4591 Fax: (306) 585-4591     
e-mail: admissions.office@uregina.ca 
web: http://www.uregina.ca

Office of the Registrar, 
University of Saskatchewan
105 Administration Place 
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 
S7N 5A2 
(306) 966-6766 Fax: (306) 966-6766     
e-mail: admissions@usask.ca 
web: http://www.usask.ca/registrar/

Secondary School Liaison, 
University of Toronto
315 Bloor Street West, 
Toronto, Ontario 
M5S 1A3 
(416) 978-2771 Fax: (416) 978-2771     
e-mail: ask@adm.utoronto.ca 
web: http://www.utoronto.ca

Director of Admission Services, 
University of Victoria
Box 3025, 
Victoria, British Columbia 
V8W 2Y2 
(604) 721-8118 Fax: (604) 721-8118     
web: http://www.uvic.ca

Secondary School Liaison, 
University of Waterloo
Waterloo, Ontario 
N2L 3G1 
(519) 885-1211 Fax: (519) 885-1211     
e-mail: watquest@nhladm.uwaterloo.ca 
web: http://www.uwaterloo.ca/home.html

Director of Liaison Services, 
University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario 
N5A 5B8 
(519) 661-2026 Fax: (519) 661-2026     
e-mail: reguwo@uwoadmin.uwo.ca 
web: http://www.uwo.ca

Director of Secondary School Liaison, 
University of Windsor
Windsor, Ontario 
N9B 3P4 
(519) 253-4232 Fax: (519) 253-4232     
e-mail: liaison@uwindsor.ca 
web:

Admissions Office 
University of Winnipeg
515 Portage Avenue, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba 
R3B 2E9 
(204) 786-9740 Fax: (204) 786-9740     
e-mail: adm@uwinnipeg.ca 
web: http://www.uwinnipeg.ca

Admissions/Liaison, 
Wilfrid Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario 
N2L 3C5 
(519) 884-1970 Fax: (519) 884-1970     
e-mail: liaison@mach1.wlu.ca  
web: http://www.wlu.ca

Secondary School Liaison, 
York University
Toronto, Ontario 
M3J 1P3 
(416) 736-5100 Fax: (416) 736-5100     
e-mail: admenq@yorku.ca  
web: http://www.yorku.ca

ADDRESSES FOR MORE INFORMATION

 CANADIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

FOR GRADS ONLY
Peirce Educational Consulting, 
540 Lakeshore Road West, 
Oakville, Ontario 
L6K 3P1 
(905) 849-4623 Fax: (905) 849-4623 

AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

 

PETERSON'S GUIDE TO FOUR YEAR COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES
Student Educational Notes, 
3537 Bathurst Street, 
Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C7 
(416) 663-8231                            Fax: (416) 663-8231    

THE FISKE GUIDE TO COLLEGES
Times Books, 
Random House, Inc. 
Toronto, Ontario

THE COLLEGE HANDBOOK
College Board Publications, 
Box 886, 
New York, New York 
10101 
U.S.A.

INSIDER'S GUIDE TO THE COLLEGES
St. Martin's Press, 
175 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, New York 
10010 
U.S.A.

 

   

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